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HIV Window Period – Timelines for Accurate HIV Testing

When it comes to HIV testing, two of the most common questions we are asked online or in person are: “When can I test for HIV?” and “Are my results conclusive?”
There is a lot of confusing information out there, so this article will try to break down the timelines for accurate testing, and why this is the case.

These Questions Are Basically Asking – What is the HIV Window Period?

The HIV window period is the time between viral transmission to be able to get a conclusively accurate test result. This time period depends on the type of HIV testing performed – different tests have different window periods, with newer generation testing allowing for earlier and more accurate diagnosis of HIV than what was available in the past.
As testing facilities vary from country to country, it is important to recognize local health authority guidelines and speak to the doctor if you have any uncertainties on your test.
If you are within 10 days from a possible HIV exposure, you are still in an eclipse period. This is the period of time where no current testing can detect the virus. HIV Testing in this time period will have no diagnostic utility.

However, if you are within 3 days (72 hours) from a potential HIV infection, please see your doctor or contact us immediately for Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP).
HIV Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) can reduce risk of HIV infection or prevent HIV infection.

WhatsApp or SMS service (24/7) : +65 8728 7272

Also Read: When to get HIV Test after HIV PEP

So, What Types of HIV Tests are Available and How Do They Work?

For diagnostic purposes, most countries and guidelines now recommend first-line testing with the 4th Generation Antigen/Antibody test (also known as the Combo or Duo test). Other available testing includes 3rd Generation Antibody-only testing, HIV RNA/DNA PCR viral load and the HIV Pro-Viral DNA Test.
These tests are sometimes available as ‘point-of-care’ rapid tests, or alternatively can be performed in a laboratory with techniques such as ELISA or CMIA (don’t worry too much about the technicalities here). To understand the differences and rationale for each of these tests, we have to first understand what each of them is looking for.

The Core Structure of HIV is Made Up of a Protein (p24 Antigen)!

HIV is a type of retrovirus, and much of its core structure is made up of a protein known as p24 antigen – this is the type of antigen we look for with 4th generation HIV testing.
The p24 antigen usually becomes detectable from 10-14 days post-exposure, reaching a peak at around 3-4 weeks, and dropping to lower levels after 5-6 weeks once HIV antibodies start forming.
HIV antibodies are proteins formed by your own body in response to the virus and usually start forming as early as 14-17 days post-exposure, with 99.9% of patients having a detectable antibody response by 3 months.

Anonymous HIV Testing is only available in our Robertson Walk Branch.

The HIV Pro-Viral DNA Test

The HIV Pro-Viral DNA test can be used in specific situations where there are challenges to getting an accurate HIV diagnosis with other available HIV tests including HIV Antibody tests (3rd Generation HIV test), HIV Antibody and Antigen tests (4th Generation HIV test) as well as HIV RNA PCR test.

It is especially useful in the following situations:

  1. Diagnosing HIV in newborns born to HIV +ve mothers
  2. Elite controllers with undetectable HIV viral load despite not being on anti-retroviral treatment
  3. Individual with sero-negative HIV infections i.e. People who get infected with HIV but do not develop anti-HIV antibodies : see FALSE NEGATIVE HIV ELISA TEST

It can be used for situations where the diagnosis of HIV is challenging, it has a lower false positive rate compared to the HIV RNA PCR test when used for diagnosis and it can be done 10 days post exposure. 

4th Generation HIV Test – 28 days or more post-exposure

The 4th generation Antigen/Antibody test has been shown to be conclusive from 28 days or more post-exposure. Remember, this test also checks for HIV antibody, so it will remain accurate for HIV diagnosis even after the p24 antigen levels drop, including years after initial infection.

3rd Generation HIV Test – 3 months or more post-exposure

The 3rd generation Antibody-only test is accepted as conclusive from 3 months or more post-exposure. If testing is done within these respective window periods, there is a chance of a false negative result.
For extremely rare cases where people do not mount an appropriate HIV-antibody response (known as seronegative infections), the 4th generation test will still be able to detect the p24 antigen, which is why it is considered the most accurate first-line test for HIV diagnosis.
You may also have heard of a test called the Western Blot; this is just another type of HIV antibody test that is usually used for confirmation testing, once a preliminary test has shown a positive result. As HIV is a serious and life-changing diagnosis, it’s important we get it right – most diagnostic algorithms require two separate tests showing a positive result before we confirm it to the patient. As the HIV window period may differ with these separate tests, it is important that your doctor chooses the right tests for you.
The last test type we’ll be looking at is the HIV RNA/DNA PCR test, also known as Nucleic Acid Amplification Testing (NAAT). This test has revolutionized HIV screening, especially for people at high risk. This test directly measures the amount of virus in a person’s blood and can detect conclusively from as early as 12 days post-exposure. It is also used to monitor viral load in people with a known HIV infection. Although this test is able to pick up HIV infection at the earliest stage, it is not widely available due largely to costs and turnaround time in Singapore. There is a slightly higher risk of false positive results with the HIV RNA/DNA PCR test.

Here’s How HIV Window Period & HIV Test Accuracy Works: 

In Summary

In summary, here are the tests you can do at the appropriate time:
Day 1-3: Consider Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)
Day 1-9: Eclipse period (no HIV testing available)
Day 10: HIV Proviral DNA Test
Day 12 onwards: HIV RNA/DNA PCR testing (may have false positives)
Day 14 onwards: 4th Generation Combo testing can start to pick up the infection (may have a false negative)
Day 28 onwards: 4th Generation Combo testing is deemed conclusive
Day 90 onwards: 3rd Generation Ab-only testing is deemed conclusive
At the end of the day, it is important to speak to your doctor and inform them accurately about any potential exposure risks, so they can decide on which test is appropriate. And remember, 4th Generation Combo testing is the first line test recommended by most guidelines today. Ask for this test if you have any doubts!
Do come to see us for any further advice on HIV testing, window periods, or other STD Testing, STD Screening & Treatment and sexual health-related matters.
We accept both walk-ins and appointment for all our clinics, please call us or email us at hello@dtapclinic.com.
Take Care!


Other Reads:

  1. Do I Have HIV Rash? Or Are They Other STD-Related Rashes?
  2. HIV Pro-Viral DNA Test
  3. HPV Infection & HPV Vaccination for Men who have sex with Men
  4. STD Risk for Receptive Unprotected Anal Sex in Men
  5. Low HIV Risk Doesn’t Mean No HIV Risk
  6. HIV PrEP for Travel – How You Need to Know
  7. An Overview on STD from an STD Doctor
  8. Everything You Need to Know about Herpes Simplex Virus
  9. How Do I Treat Oral Herpes (Cold Sores)
  10. Syphilis Symptoms – Painless Sore & Ulcers
  11. HIV Symptoms – What You Need to Know
  12. 10 Common HIV related Opportunistic Infections

Do I Have HIV Rash? Or Are They From Other STD Related Rashes

Skin rashes and lesions are some of the most common signs and symptoms experienced in HIV infection. There is no single definitive HIV rash – individuals may have different types of rashes of varying severity, distribution, and appearance.
As there are many other conditions that can also cause skin rashes, including allergies, autoimmune conditions, and other infections, it is important to remember that there is no way to diagnose someone with HIV based solely on the presence of a rash. Conversely, there is also no way we can rule out HIV just because someone does not have a skin rash. The only way to know for sure is by doing an HIV test at the appropriate time.

Acute HIV Seroconversion HIV Rash

In the primary stage of HIV infection, viral replication progresses quickly and the viral load (VL) will be very high. Your body’s immune system will detect the virus and start producing HIV antibodies to try and fight off the virus – this process is called seroconversion. It is this activity of the immune system which can manifest in the typical symptoms of acute HIV infection, also known as Acute Retroviral Syndrome (ARS) – with fever, swollen lymph nodes, and rashes being the most common symptoms.
The seroconversion HIV rash usually develops around 2-6 weeks from exposure. It will appear as reddish macules (flat lesions) and papules (small swollen bumps) spread over a generalized region, typically over the chest, back, and abdomen, sometimes extending to the arms and legs as well. It can be very itchy for some people, but not always. Symptoms of itch can be reduced by antihistamines and topical creams.
These rashes may last a few weeks or months, but will eventually resolve by themselves, even if the HIV infection has not been diagnosed and treated. This happens as the HIV antibodies bring down the viral load and infected individuals enter the clinically latent stage (chronic HIV infection). Many people may have missed the diagnosis of HIV if they were told by a doctor their rash was due to some allergy or viral flu but did not get tested properly.

Other Infections

When a person contracts HIV, they are also at increased risk of other infections. Some of these are sexually transmitted and can be contacted at the same time as HIV (e.g. syphilis, herpes simplex virus, etc.), while some can occur later in the disease due to a weakened immune system (e.g. candida/thrush). These infections can also cause skin rashes or lesions to develop, so it is important to look out for any abnormal skin changes if you are concerned about any potential exposure risk, and also to inform your doctor of your concerns.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacteria Treponema Pallidum and is commonly diagnosed together with new HIV infection as they share common risk factors. The primary stage of syphilis infection is a painless chancre or ulcer at the primary site of infection (usually genital, rectal, or oral), but it may go unnoticed by many people. The secondary stage of syphilis is a skin rash which can look very similar to acute HIV rash, with reddish papules around the trunk, arms and legs, and usually over the palms and soles as well – most of the time, this rash is not itchy or painful. Most people who present with a skin rash after potential exposure risk should be tested for both HIV and syphilis together.

Herpes Simplex Virus

Another sexually transmitted infection, herpes simplex virus (HSV) can cause small crops of fluid-filled blisters that can start off looking like a reddish rash. They are usually slightly itchy or painful, and may then burst to form small ulcers which will then dry and crust over. Sometimes, the initial herpes outbreak may be preceded by some viral, flu-like symptoms including fever and swollen lymph nodes. There is no ‘cure’ for herpes, but usually, your immune system will help to control the infection and keep it dormant, although reactivation and clinical outbreaks can still occur (around 2-3x per year on average). Herpes can be contracted both together with acute HIV or can recur frequently in late-stage HIV – persistent or chronic HSV lesions in the setting of untreated or late-stage HIV is considered an AIDS-defining illness, as the immune system has been weakened by the HIV virus and can no longer keep the HSV infection suppressed.

Kaposi Sarcoma

Not quite a rash, but rather an abnormal growth of capillary blood vessel tissues, Kaposi Sarcoma (KS) is actually a type of cancer that can be found in late-stage HIV.
It is caused by an infection with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) which is an opportunistic infection and is also considered an AIDS-defining illness as the transformation of the skin cells only occurs in the presence of a weakened immune system. KS appears as either a single or multiple reddish purplish bumps over the skin or mucous membranes.
They are usually painless and not itchy but can cause other symptoms if they grow on internal organs such as the gastrointestinal tract or the lungs (e.g. GI bleeding, shortness of breath, etc.).
Also, read the 10 Common HIV-Related Opportunistic Infections (IOs)

Candidiasis

Also known as thrush, candida is a very common fungal organism that is found in the environment and can be isolated from around 30-50% of healthy people. Most of the time, it does not cause any symptoms of infection; however, in people with a weakened immune system, there may be an invasive overgrowth of the organism which leads to symptoms. Common areas of candida infection are the nails, skin, mouth/tongue, and genital region. Depending on the region affected, symptoms may include an itchy rash, with scaly or flaking skin, sometimes with a soft whitish layer which can be scraped off.
These are just some of the different types of skin rashes and lesions that may be present in an HIV infection. There is no single type of HIV rash that we can consider to be diagnostic by itself. It is important to assess clinical features of the rash, timing, and potential exposure risk. At the end of the day, the only way to diagnose an HIV infection will be through appropriate HIV testing at any of our clinics.
Join the HIV discussion in our Forum with our Doctors. For HIV Testing, you can walk-in to any of our clinics, for an appointment you can email us at hello@dtapclinic.com, or call any of our clinics.
Take Care. Be Safe!


Other Interesting Reads:

  1. What You Need To Know about HPV, Cervical Cancer, Pap Smear & HPV Vaccination
  2. World AIDS Day (2018) #KnowYourStatus – By Dr Tan Kok Kuan
  3. 4 Things You Need to Know About Penile Health
  4. Sexual Health Advice For Travellers 
  5. What are the Symptoms of HIV Infection and AIDS?
  6. Things You Need to Know about Travelling & HIV PrEP
  7. 11 Causes of Dyspareunia (Pain During Intercourse)
  8. What is HPV Vaccination (Gardasil 9)
  9. 10 Causes of abnormal Vaginal Lumps and Bumps
  10. An Overview of Gonorrhoea
  11. What is the Treatment for Cold Sores? What causes Cold Sores?
  12. Herpes: Everything You Need to Know!
  13. The HIV Pro-Viral DNA Test can be done 10 days post exposure.

How Do I Get Tested For An Anonymous HIV Test In Singapore

These 3 letters H, I, and V put together, or commonly known as the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, sets alarm bells ringing in most people’s minds. Often, the anxiety and concern that goes through one’s mind can often be allayed through a simple consult with our doctors to assess your risk and or a test to decide what to do next.
Still concerned? Read on to find out more and take the next step to schedule a consultation and Anonymous HIV Testing in Singapore with our doctors.

How is it Even Possible to Get HIV Tested Anonymously?

Yes it is that simple with our “3 step test” guide
Step 1:

  • Walk into our clinic at Robertson Walk.
  • Let our staff know you are here for the “AHT”.

Step 2:

  • Private consultation with the doctor.
  • The doctor will proceed with the “3 Step Test”.

Step 3:

  • After 20 minutes your results will be ready.
  • Reviewing of your HIV test result with our doctor.

Who Should Get HIV Tested?

If you have a concern for HIV transmission or even a sexual health concern, we advise you to see us get your queries addressed.
Where appropriate, we will support you with the HIV test.

How Is HIV Testing Done? I am Scared of Needles

A small finger prick is done, it will be slightly uncomfortable, and a few drops of blood are collected. No needles are involved.

How Long Do I Have to Wait for the HIV Test Results?

The results take 20 mins to be ready and your doctor will discuss the results with you

How Much Does the Anonymous HIV Test cost?

Rapid Fingerprick HIV (3rdGen Test) – (90 days after exposure)
$53.60 (after GST)
Rapid Fingerprick HIV Combo Test (4thGeneration) – (28 days after exposure)
$160.60 (after GST)
All results take 20 mins. Consultation charge is between $20 – $30.

Anonymous HIV Testing in Singapore is only available in our Robertson Walk Branch.

Upholding Patient Confidentiality is our utmost priority. Therefore reports will NOT be snail mailed by post. Results can be communicated via phone or email.
During the private consultation, you can speak to our doctors about all of your HIV-related concerns. The doctor will then recommend the correct HIV Test or STD test.
Our registered doctors will administer the HIV and STD tests, which are approved by the Health Sciences Authority (HSA)


Other Reads:

  1. Low HIV Risk Doesn’t Mean No HIV Risk
  2. Do I Have HIV Rash? Or Are They Other STD-Related Rashes?
  3. What are the Causes of Abnormal Penile Discharge?
  4. HIV PrEP for Travel – How You Need to Know
  5. An Overview on STD from an STD Doctor
  6. Why Do I Have AbnormalVaginal Discharge
  7. How Late Can a Period Be (Delayed Menstrual Cycle)
  8. Everything You Need to Know about Herpes Simplex Virus
  9. How Do I Treat Oral Herpes (Cold Sores)
  10. Syphilis Symptoms – Painless Sore & Ulcers
  11. HIV Symptoms – What You Need to Know
  12. 10 Common HIV related Opportunistic Infections

Top 10 Anonymous HIV Testing (AHT) Clinics in Singapore

10 Anonymous HIV Testing (AHT) Clinics in Singapore
Anonymous HIV testing (“AHT”) offers a level of privacy and confidentiality as your personal particulars are not required. Rapid HIV test kits are used in anonymous HIV testing. The results of rapid HIV tests can be available within 20 minutes.
In Singapore Anonymous HIV testing is only offered at the following ten AHT clinics:

No.AHT Clinic Name Address and Opening Hours
1Dr Tan & Partners (DTAP) @ Robertson
 
11 Unity Street, Robertson Walk #02-07 Singapore 237995
Mon to Fri: 8am to 9pm
Sat and Sun: 9am to 2pm
Public Holidays: Closed
Website: https://www.dtapclinic.com
2Action for Aids
 
31 Kelantan Lane #01-16 Singapore 200031
Tues and Wed: 6.30pm to 8.15pm
Sat: 1.30pm to 3.15pm
Public Holidays and eve of Public Holidays: Closed
Website: www.afa.org.sg
 
3Anteh Dispensary
 
1 Lorong 22 Geylang #01-02 Singapore 398664
Mon to Fri: 9am to 12noon, 2pm to 5pm, 7pm to 11pm
Sat: 9am to 12noon, 1pm to 6pm, 7pm to 11pm
Sun and Public Holiday: 1pm to 6pm, 7pm to 11pm
Website: https://anteh-dispensary-pte-ltd.business.site
4Doctor Jay Medical Centre115 Killiney Road Singapore 239553
Mon to Fri: 9.30am to 4pm, 6pm to 8.30pm
Sat: 9.30am to 12noon
Sun: 6.30pm to 8.30pm | Public Holidays: Closed
Website: http://www.drjay.clinic/
5Dr Soh Family ClinicBlk 966 Jurong West Street 93 #01-221 Singapore 640966
Mon and Tue: 8.30am to 1pm, 2pm to 4.30pm, 7pm to 9pm
Wed to Sun and Public Holidays: Closed
Website: NA
6M Lam Clinic739 Geylang Road Singapore 389649
Mon to Fri: 9am to 12.30pm, 2pm to 5.30pm
Sat: 9am to 12.30pm
Sun and Public Holidays: Closed
 
7Doctors Clinic & Surgery
 
305 Woodlands St 31, #01-91, Singapore 730305
Mon to Fri: 8.30am to 12pm, 2pm to 4.30pm, 6.30pm to 8.30pm
Sat/Sun: 8.30am to 12pm | Public Holidays: Closed
Website: https://www.doctorsclinicandsurgery.net/
8Kensington Family Clinic14D Kensington Park Road, Serangoon Garden Estate, Singapore 557265
Mon to Sun: 8am to 3pm, 6pm to 10pm
Public Holidays: Closed
Website: www.kensingtonfamilyclinic.com
9Q&M Medical & Aesthetic Clinic (Tampines Central)10 Tampines Central 1, #04-18/19, Tampines One, Singapore 529536
Mon to Fri: 9am to 1pm, 2pm to 9pm
Sat and Sun: 9am to 1pm
Public Holidays: Closed
Website: http://www.qandmmedical.com.sg
10Tanjong Pagar Medical Clinic1 Tanjong Pagar Plaza, #01-06 Singapore 082001
Mon, Wed and Fri: 9am to 6pm
Tues and Thur: 9am to 9pm
Sat and Sun: 9am to 2pm | Public Holidays: Closed
Website: www.tanjongpagarclinic.com/

 
For individuals who suspect that they are at risk or not sure if they show symptoms of HIV, please make a visit to any of the nearest 10 Anonymous HIV Testing clinics in Singapore to be tested by the doctors today.

What is HIV PrEP & Event-Driven Based HIV PrEP Strategy?

What is HIV PrEP?

HIV PrEP is an option for HIV prevention and involves taking medication that can reduce the risk of HIV transmission by up to 95% if taken properly.
Most of the time, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis, or HIV PrEP for short is taken as a daily tablet and needs to be taken consistently to provide the greatest level of protection.
HIV PrEP is recommended for at-risk groups, including men-who-have-sex-with-men, patients who have a known partner who is living with HIV (PLHIV), or those with multiple partners of unknown HIV status.

What is the difference between HIV PEP (HIV Post Exposure Prophylaxis) & HIV PrEP?

HIV PrEP should not be mistaken for HIV PEP or HIV Post Exposure Prophylaxis.

HIV PEP is for any individual who is at risk of HIV infection after an HIV exposed to HIV to take HIV medicines for a month to reduce his or her chances of HIV infection.

HIV Pre Exposure prophylaxis and HIV Post Exposure Prophylaxis do not 100% reduce your chances of HIV infection, nor prevent you from being infected with other Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) besides HIV.

HIV PEP as an HIV prevention strategy was first developed for healthcare workers, who are being exposed to contaminated blood or needles prick. It has since expanded to other HIV high-risk activities such as sexual exposure and intravenous drugs used.

Another development of HIV prevention is by using HIV Pre Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) as a strategy to reduce the chances of HIV infection even before any potential HIV exposure.

What is Event Driven Based HIV PrEP Strategy?

Some people may find that taking a daily table is just not suitable for them.
If this is the case, they may consider an option called Event-Based Dosing, or EBD for short.
This entails taking tablets one day before the exposure, the days of exposure, and for one day after the last exposure.
It is a much shorter course of tablets than regular HIV PrEP, and can still provide a high level of protection from HIV, with up to 85% risk reduction.
HIV PrEP is most effective when used in combination with other protective strategies such as condoms and regular STD screening.

Descovy As New HIV Medication For HIV PrEP

Descovy (brand name) is a FDA approved new drug combination of tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) + emtricitabine for use as HIV PrEP, which has shown to be equally effective in preventing HIV infection whilst touting an improved safety profile for renal and bone toxicity.

Descovy is currently available in all Dr Tan & Partners (DTAP clinics) in Singapore. It is a prescription only medication and must be prescribed by a doctor. Speak to our doctors for more information about Descovy and find out if a HIV-1 treatment that contains Descovy is right for you.

If you are interested in learning more about HIV PrEP or EBD, please come down to our any of our clinics to speak to our doctors, and see if these options are suitable for you. You can learn more about the What is HIV PrEP or HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis.
We can advise you in more detail on the indications, dosage and timing, and potential side effects of the medications, as well as how to follow up with appropriate HIV Testing and STD testing.
Take Care!


Other Reads:

  1. Do I Have HIV Rash? Or Are They Other STD-Related Rashes?
  2. The HIV Proviral DNA Test can be done 10 days post exposure.
  3. Weak Erection? Erectile Dysfunction? How to Improve Erection with Pills
  4. HPV Infection & HPV Vaccination for Men who have sex with Men
  5. STD Risk for Receptive Unprotected Anal Sex in Men
  6. Low HIV Risk Doesn’t Mean No HIV Risk
  7. HIV PrEP for Travel – How You Need to Know
  8. An Overview on STD from an STD Doctor
  9. Everything You Need to Know about Herpes Simplex Virus
  10. How Do I Treat Oral Herpes (Cold Sores)
  11. Syphilis Symptoms – Painless Sore & Ulcers
  12. HIV Symptoms – What You Need to Know
  13. 10 Common HIV related Opportunistic Infections

Anonymous HIV Testing + Emotional Support + Community Outreach

Getting an HIV test can be a scary affair for most people in the community.
Besides the stigma that is associated with HIV & AIDS, there is also the anxiety that comes along with knowing your HIV-status. This is definitely overwhelming for many of us.
Not forgetting the 20 minutes agonising wait for your HIV test result that seems forever.
Dr. Tan & Partners & Oogachaga have teamed up to provide Anonymous HIV testing & emotional support for the community in a discreet and confidential environment in our Robertson branch every first Friday evening of the month.

Dr. Tan & Partners  @Robertson is a Minister of Health of Singapore approved HIV test site for Anonymous HIV Testing.

Oogachaga is a community-based, non-profit, professional organisation working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning and queer (LGBTQ+) individuals, couples and families in Singapore since 1999

Anonymous HIV Testing

Anonymous HIV testing is for local or foreign individuals who would like to get their HIV test done, but prefer not be identified.
Hence, we do not collect your NRIC or passport numbers, address or contact numbers during registration.
Both negative and positive HIV result is kept anonymous and confidential.
If you suspect that you have any HIV signs & symptoms or have questions in regards to HIV window periods, you can chat with our open – friendly doctors on all STD/HIV related medical concerns.
All HIV tests are administered by our doctors in our STD clinic.

Emotional Support

While waiting to see our doctor, or after the doctor has administered the Anonymous HIV test, you (or your partner) may request to talk in private with the professional counsellor from Oogachaga for free. No additional charges will be added to your medical bill.
The counsellor can offer you guidance on other non-medical issues related to your sexual health concerns or other personal problems. Oogachaga has been working with (LGBTQ+) individuals, couples and families in Singapore since 1999.
Sometimes, it helps to be able to chat with someone to take your mind off the HIV test.

How to go about it?

Step 1: Reception

Let our friendly staffs know you need an “AHT test”.  No appointment required.

Step 2: See a Doctor

A doctor will have a private consultation with you & administer the HIV test.

Step 2-A: Chat with Counsellor

Instead of waiting alone, you can choose to speak to the counsellor, who is LGBTQ-friendly before or after you see our doctors.

You can ask the counsellor questions about HIV/ STIs, or have a chat about coming out, relationships, sexuality, safer sex…..

(The session will be kept confidential, even from the doctor, if you wish)

Step 3: HIV Test Result & Review

After 20 mins, your HIV test result will be ready & the doctor will review the result with you.

When is it available?

If you wish to speak to the counsellor please visit us Every first Friday evening (6 pm – 9 pm) of the month at out Robertson Branch
Anonymous HIV Testing is available daily from 8 am – 9 pm on weekdays and 9 am to 2 pm on weekends at our Robertson branch.
There are no additional medical charges for speaking to the counsellor from Oogachaga. The medical bill only includes your HIV test and doctor consultations.
No appointment is required.

X.O.X.O
Dr Jonathon Ti


Other Interesting Reads:

  1. An Overview of STD – From an STD Doctor
  2. Top Travel Tips for People Living with HIV
  3. 4 Penile Health Tips
  4. An Overview of Gonorrhoea
  5. What is the Treatment for Cold Sores? What causes Cold Sores?
  6. Genital Warts: The Cauliflower-Like Lumps on the Genitals
  7. Syphilis Symptoms (Painless STD Sores & STD Rashes)
  8. What You Need to Know about Prostate Massage
  9. 10 Ways to Improve Sexual Performace for Men
  10. HIV PrEP for Travel