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Can I get an STD from a hand job?

This is a very common question that I get from patients who come to see me. Some are worried about contracting STDs when giving or receiving hand jobs or masturbation from another person. Generally speaking, there is very little risk of contracting STDs from a hand job.

Even though it is low risk, it is still not zero risk. Let me share with you some points about hand jobs and STDs.


You getting the hand job VS when you’re giving the hand job

Generally hand jobs have very low risk of transmission of STDs. However, if you give the hand job, you are at lower risk of getting an STD as compared to when receiving one. Why is that? STDs tend to affect genitals more than our hands. So if you are at the receiving end, it is your genitals that are at risk. If you are giving the hand job, it is less likely for you to get STDs unless you touch your own genitals after giving the hand job.


Type of STDs that might be transmitted through a hand job

Not all STDs are transmissible via handjobs. It is usually the ones that are passed on through skin to skin contact that are transmissible.

These include: 

  • Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Type 1 and 2. This usually causes painful sores or vesicles around the lips or genital areas. There is no cure for the virus but you can take antiviral medication when the symptoms appear to reduce the duration and severity of the symptoms.
  • Human Papilloma Virus (HPV): This virus usually causes genital warts. Warts are flesh coloured growths on the skin. There is also no treatment to treat the virus but there are different types of treatment available to remove the warts when they appear.
  • Molluscum Contagiosum: This is causes by a virus that lives on the skin. It can also be spread via skin to skin contact. It appears as small firm bumps on the skin which are generally harmless and painless. They usually go away on its own or you can get it removed by a doctor through freezing or laser removal.

How can you prevent it? What is considered “safe sex”?

As how we advise for all STDs, abstinence is best. 

Avoid multiple partners. Keeping to one partner minimizes the risk of STDs.

Avoid high risk exposure from sex workers or those who work in massage parlours. These workers have high exposure to several people a day so you will be at higher risk.

Condoms: Condoms may provide some protection. However do take note that areas not covered by the condom is still at risk of STDs.


Get tested to be sure!

If you’re ever in doubt, or unsure of your risks and or symptoms, do seek medical advice. The doctor will be able to advise if you need to get tested or get treated.


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Sexual Health Advice for Traveller

Passport, Phone, Plane tickets and….. PrEP!

Planning your next trip – for business or pleasure, or both? Apart from the usual, do you make plans for your own sexual health?

What? Why?
Whether you’re straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender or just curious and questioning, lots of people have casual sex when they travel, so you’re not alone.
However, lots of research and experience show that the risk of developing a sexually transmitted infection (STI) – like HIV, syphilis or others – is increased when you travel. 1
This could be due to increased risk-taking behaviour when we travel abroad. The reasons may include increased freedom, alcohol and drug use, loneliness, peer pressure or a general sexual lifestyle when you’re abroad.2
Of course, there are those who travel abroad specifically for sex, in what some call “Sex Tourism”, which is the intention of travel overseas to purchase sex. This usually involves travelling to neighbouring countries to purchase sex from commercial sex workers.
Whatever your reasons for travel, if you’re unprepared for sex you may be putting yourself at risk and participate in behaviours that you wouldn’t consider at home.3
 

So how? Top tips for your Sexual Health Risk Reduction  (T.R.A.V.E.L)

T for Testing & treatment of STIs

  • Please get tested prior to travel as blisters, ulcers, bumps provide an entry point for STIs into the body. Having an STI increases the risk of HIV transmission by 10 fold!
  • Periodic STD Screening & Anonymous HIV Testing can keep your status in check
  • Don’t assume your partner is STD-free because s/he doesn’t mention it and, STDs are often asymptomatic. Talk openly with him or her about your STD and HIV status and date of the last testing3

R for Rubbers & Lube

  • Unprotected (without a condom) sex with a new/casual partner carries a risk of contracting STIs or blood-borne viruses.
  • Stock up on condoms and lube, keep them in a cool place, practice using them and get confident in talking about using them before you go.

A for Alcohol & Drug Use

  • Be careful when having sex after alcohol use. With alcohol or other drugs, one is more likely to take risks: not using a condom, having sex with someone you normally wouldn’t have sex with. We encourage condoms to be used for all forms of sexual activity especially with new/casual partners.

*Note: We do not support illicit drug use and urge our readers to abide by the host country’s drug laws. Singapore has strict anti-drug laws. Any citizen or permanent resident found to have abused controlled drugs overseas will be treated as if he or she had abused drugs in Singapore. Furthermore,  possession, consumption, manufacturing, import, export, or trafficking of controlled drugs in any amount are illegal.

V for Vaccinations

  • Discuss with our DTAP team the risk of infections, STIs and Blood Borne Viruses and any vaccines that are available (plan ahead as some vaccinations may take up to 6 months for full immunity). The vaccines that we recommend are the HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccine, also known as Gardasil 9, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B vaccination.

E for Education

  • Empower yourself with information where sex may be available, at your travel destination.4
  • Ensure you are vaccinated against Hepatitis B, carry and use kite-marked condoms, consider taking oral HIV PrEP (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis) prior.

L for Living and travelling with HIV

 
Get tested after you return and last but not least, consider PrEP before you travel!  Learn more about Travelling with HIV PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis)

Safe Trip and Have Fun!
This article was written by Dr Tan & Partners, in collaboration with Oogachaga.


References

  1. Vivancos R, Abubakar I, Hunter PR. Foreign travel, casual sex, and sexually transmitted infections: systematic review and meta-analysis. International Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2010;14(10):e842–51.
  2. Svensson P.,et al. A meta-analysis and systematic literature review of factors associated with sexual risk-taking during international travel. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease. 2018; Jul – Aug;24:65-88
  3. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/std
  4. https://www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk/advice/general-travel-health-advice/sexual-health-risks
  5. Riddell Jt, Amico KR, Mayer KH. HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis: A Review. Jama. 2018;319(12):1261-8.
  6. WHO Guidelines Approved by the Guidelines Review Committee. Guideline on When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy and on Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV. Geneva: World Health Organization Copyright (c) World Health Organization 2015.; 2015.
  7. Elsesser SA, Oldenburg CE, Biello KB, Mimiaga MJ, Safren SA, Egan JE, et al. Seasons of Risk: Anticipated Behavior on Vacation and Interest in Episodic Antiretroviral Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Among a Large National Sample of U.S. Men Who have Sex with Men (MSM). AIDS and behavior. 2016;20(7):1400-7.
  8. Brett-Major DM, Scott PT, Crowell TA, Polyak CS, Modjarrad K, Robb ML, et al. Are you PEPped and PrEPped for travel? Risk mitigation of HIV infection for travelers. Tropical diseases, travel medicine and vaccines. 2016;2:25
  9. Hampel B, Reinacher M, Fehr JS, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP): Is it time to rethink HIV prevention in travelers?, Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease (2018), doi: 10.1016/j.tmaid.2018.06.008
  10. https://www.iwantprepnow.co.uk/how-to-take-prep/

What is Rapid Chlamydia & Gonorrhea PCR STD Testing?

Chlamydia and gonorrhoea are 2 common Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) which can infections in various parts of the body such as penis, vaginal, anus, throat and eyes.
Most commonly you will experience discharges from the penis/ vaginal or discomfort when passing urine.
However, the majority of men may not have any symptoms and for women, 50% may also not have symptoms.
The infection will stay in the body for a few weeks after the symptoms have been treated.
In rare instances, Gonorrhoea and Chlamydia can continue to cause damage to the body, specifically the urethra and testicles. Pain may also spread to the rectum. An overview of Gonorrhoea

At Dr Tan and Partners, we recognize that symptoms like abnormal vaginal discharges, penile discharge or discharge from the rectum can cause quite a bit of worry.
Thus, we have introduced a Rapid STD testing (next day results) that can detect these 2 infections within a day.
Which means that you can get the necessary treatment quickly as well.
All it requires is a urine sample or swab from the vaginal/ throat/ anal

This Rapid STD Testing detects for the presence of the DNA of the 2 organisms, making the test very sensitive

If you think you may have symptoms suggestive of chlamydia or gonorrhoea infection or if you think you may have been exposed and you are interested in an STD Screening, please visit a doctor for further evaluation.

Take Care!


Other Reads:

  1. Do I Have HIV Rash? Or Are They Other STD-Related Rashes?
  2. Weak Erection? Erectile Dysfunction? How to Improve Erection with Pills
  3. HPV Infection & HPV Vaccination for Men who have sex with Men
  4. STD Risk for Receptive Unprotected Anal Sex in Men
  5. Low HIV Risk Doesn’t Mean No HIV Risk
  6. HIV PrEP for Travel – How You Need to Know
  7. An Overview on STD from an STD Doctor
  8. Everything You Need to Know about Herpes Simplex Virus
  9. How Do I Treat Oral Herpes (Cold Sores)
  10. Syphilis Symptoms – Painless Sore & Ulcers
  11. HIV Symptoms – What You Need to Know
  12. 10 Common HIV related Opportunistic Infections