Why Do I Have Abnormal Vaginal Discharge?

Let’s talk a little about normal vaginal discharge first.

The vagina is a muscular passage which leads from the vaginal opening to the cervix, which is the entrance to the womb. There are naturally occurring “good” lactobacillus and other bacteria which are part of the normal vaginal flora. The walls of the vagina have glands which produce secretions for the cleansing of the vaginal canal. Normal vaginal discharge is a result of these secretions. It is usually clear or whitish and largely odourless and may change slightly throughout your menstrual cycle.
 

via GIPHY
 

How to identify abnormal vaginal discharge and what you should be worried about?

However, when you notice a major change from your usual vaginal discharge, this abnormal vaginal discharge may indicate that something is wrong.
Signs that your vaginal discharge may be abnormal include different coloured discharge – greenish, yellowish, greyish or even brownish discharge, the presence of a bad vaginal odour, changes in discharge consistency such as thicker, clumpy discharge or large amounts of watery discharge.
If this discharge is accompanied by abdominal pain, fever, or spotting/bleeding after sexual intercourse or bleeding when your period is not due yet, then these are all alarming features that should Fprompt you to consult a doctor.
Abnormal vaginal discharge is one of the most common female health problems and it should not be something you feel you have to suffer in silence about. Most ladies will experience this at some point in their life and while it can be an extremely distressing and uncomfortable problem, it is very treatable.
 
 

You probably have a vaginal infection.

The top cause of abnormal vaginal discharge is a vaginal infection, also known as vaginitis. Other rare causes of abnormal vaginal discharge include cervical abnormalities such as cervical cancer.
The next question, then, would be what sort of infections you have to worry about if you are experiencing abnormal vaginal discharge. These can broadly be divided into Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and non-Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs).
The most common causes of abnormal vaginal discharge are non-sexually transmitted infections- Bacterial Vaginosis and yeast infections. These all occur when there is disruption to the delicate balance of your healthy vaginal flora and can be triggered by a multitude of factors.
However, if you have had unprotected sexual intercourse, particularly if you are unsure of your partner’s infection status (whether this be a casual partner or a long-term partner), then your abnormal vaginal discharge may very well be due to a Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) such as Chlamydia, Gonorrhoea, Trichomonas, and various types of Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma bacteria.
Regardless of the underlying cause of your abnormal vaginal discharge, proper evaluation is crucial as it allows you to receive the appropriate treatment, which is important not just in relieving your discomfort but also in preventing more serious, long-term complications (like Pelvic Inflammatory Disease) that can occur with certain infections.
 
 

Why does the abnormal vaginal discharge keep coming back?

This is a very common question and recurrent abnormal vaginal discharge can be an extremely frustrating and distressing issue.
Recurrent yeast infections and bacterial vaginosis tend to be responsible for the above phenomenon and can be triggered by a variety of factors which upset the balance of your vaginal flora.
 

1) Hormonal Fluctuations

  • For some ladies, they may find that the hormonal fluctuations during their peri-menstrual period (before or after menses), may cause them to be prone to recurrent yeast infections.
  • Pregnancy

 

2) Weakened Immune System

  • If you have diabetes or are undergoing any other sort of medical treatment that affects your immunity, you may be more prone to recurrent yeast infections.

 

3) Sexual Lifestyle

  • Sexual intercourse can trigger off bacterial vaginosis – in fact, the number of sexual partners which one has had is actually a risk factor for bacterial vaginosis, with every new partner that a lady has increased the risk of Bacterial Vaginosis infections.
  • Other habits like using spermicide may also kill off the good lactobacilli in the vagina and lead to increased susceptibility to infection

 

4) Medications

  • Being on the combined oral contraceptive pill does increase your risk of recurrent yeast infections
  • Antibiotic usage (for instance, taking something for a bacterial throat infection) can also (ironically) upset the delicate balance down there

 

5) Hygiene Habits

  • Use of vaginal douche washes or feminine washes with harsh chemicals can disrupt your natural vaginal balance and lead to increased yeast and BV infections
  • Tight underwear, pantyliners or menstrual pads which trap humidity and moisture may also place you at increased risk for a yeast infection

 
As can be seen, not all triggers may be entirely avoidable but good habits- like avoiding feminine douche washes, wearing breathable cotton underwear, minimising antibiotic use unless medically indicated, and using condoms- do play a part in helping you maintain a healthy vagina.
If you keep having abnormal vaginal discharge that comes back with a vengeance after the initial episode, do speak to your doctor about additional treatment that may be suitable for you.
 
Remember that you are not alone – abnormal vaginal discharge is common – and treatable!
Don’t let your discomfort about the topic keep you from treatment.
 
Take Care!

Other Interesting Reads:

    1. What You Need To Know about HPV, Cervical Cancer, Pap Smear & HPV Vaccination
    2. 11 Causes of Dyspareunia (Pain During Intercourse)
    3. How Do I Get an Anonymous HIV Testing?
    4. What is HPV Vaccination (Gardasil 9)
    5. 10 Causes of abnormal Vaginal Lumps and Bumps
    6. An Overview of Gonorrhoea
    7. What is the Treatment for Cold Sores? What causes Cold Sores?

 
 

Cervical Cancer, Pap Smear & HPV Vaccination – What You Need To Know

What is Pap Smear?

Pap smear is a cervical cancer screening recommended every 3 years for all sexually active females starting from age 25 years old.

This is a quick, simple and painless procedure that can be done in the clinic and it only takes a few minutes.  A brush will be used to collect some cells from the neck of the womb (cervix) and it will be sent to the lab to identify any precancerous and cancerous cells.

Cervical Cancer

In Singapore, cervical cancer is the 3rd leading cause of cancer deaths in women age 15-44 years old.
Cervical cancer risk is increased with :

  1. Multiple sexual partners
  2. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection
  3. Smoking
  4. Unprotected sex

What is Human papillomavirus (HPV)?

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the commonest sexually transmitted infection. It can affect both men and women.
There are 2 types of HPV – the low risk and high-risk types.

  1. Low-risk HPV can cause genital warts in both female and males. These are flesh coloured growths on the genitals, and they are infectious.
  2. High-risk HPV plays a significant role in the increased risk of cancer, such as cancer of the cervix, vulva, and vagina in women as well as anal cancer in men who have sex with men (MSM)..

The American College Obstetrician and Gynaecologist (ACOG) strongly recommends co-testing using Pap smear and HPV DNA testing (high-risk HPV types) especially for women ages 30-65 years old.
Patients are advised to repeat these tests in 5 years if pap smear and HPV results are negative.
This allows patients to extend their screening interval.

However, for women who test positive for high-risk HPV types, this means their risk is increased and hence, may need to have Pap smear screening at a closer interval, i.e once a year and depending on the results of the pap smear, some may need a referral to a gynaecologist for early intervention.

Remember, women can have no symptoms with an abnormal pap smear and HPV infection. Hence, early detection and screening are crucial as early intervention can be life-saving. Symptoms such as bleeding and pain during sex (postcoital bleeding), bleeding in between periods, heavy vaginal bleeding, and bleeding after menopause are usually late signs of cervical cancer.

The good news is cervical cancer can be prevented through vaccination.

GARDASIL 9 is a vaccine that helps protect against Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Most people infected with HPV show no signs or symptoms, this means they can transmit the HPV virus to others without knowing it in any kind of sexual activity or skin to skin contact.

Gardasil 9 provides protection against 9 major strains of HPV, which includes HPV types 6,11,16,18,31,33,45, 52 and 58 which are responsible up to 90% of genital warts and cervical cancers or precancer changes.

The vaccine, however, does not treat the infection.

It can be given to both females and males from the age of 9 up to 45 years old.
From the age of 9-14 years, 2 doses 6 months apart is recommended while those age 15 onwards, 3 doses will be recommended according to the schedule of 0, 2 and 6 months.
The side effects post vaccination is usually mild and temporary including pain, swelling, bruising over injections site and very rarely may cause fever and nausea.
HPV vaccine reduces your risk significantly but it does not mean your risk becomes zero.

After the completion of HPV vaccination, all women who are sexually active and above the age of 25 should still undergo routine screening via pap smear.

If you are due for your routine PAP smear or if you have questions about cervical cancer screening & HPV vaccination and wish to find out more, please call or visit any of our clinics or drop us an email at hello@dtapclinic.com.sg
We have Female doctors at our Robertson Walk, & The DUO Galleria Branches Location. Call our clinic @ +65 6976 5023 

Take Care! 

Other Interesting Reads:

    1. What You Need To Know about HPV, Cervical Cancer, Pap Smear & HPV Vaccination
    2. 11 Causes of Dyspareunia (Pain During Intercourse)
    3. What is HPV Vaccination (Gardasil 9)
    4. 10 Causes of abnormal Vaginal Lumps and Bumps
    5. An Overview of Gonorrhoea
    6. Herpes – What You Need to Know
    7. The Good Wrinkles, Bad Wrinkles & the Ugly Wrinkles

HIV PrEP for Travel – Things You Need to Know

What is HIV PrEP?

Use of oral anti-retroviral drugs by HIV-uninfected people to block the acquisition of HIV before exposure to HIV.

Why HIV PrEP?

Many trials have been conducted to determine the effectiveness of oral HIV PrEP across couples of all orientations. When patients follow the treatment and prevention strategies closely, significant prevention of HIV levels was achieved
In 2014, WHO (World Health Organisation) developed consolidated HIV guidelines for key populations, including men who have sex with men, sex workers, transgender people. In those guidelines, HIV PrEP was strongly recommended for men who have sex with men (MSM).6
During travel, the risk of acquiring HIV is the result of a change of HIV prevalence at the destination, and more importantly the change of sexual behaviour abroad and the increase of risk-taking behaviour. Studies have shown that amongst the MSM community, awareness of a special form of PrEP use, often described as “holiday PrEP” is becoming increasingly popular. This holds true even for MSM who do not consider themselves to be at high risk for HIV.7

How?

Prior to starting PrEP, your doctor will do blood tests to monitor your kidney and liver function, a full STI screen if you have not had one recently and also an HIV test.
Subsequently when on PrEP, your renal function will be monitored every quarter. Long-term PrEP use will also require monitoring of your bone density.

When?

How you take your PrEP depends on10:

  • how far in advance you plan on having sex
  • how regularly you have sex.

It does not necessarily depend on how much sex you have.

There are 4 Different Ways to Use HIV PrEP

There are 4 different ways to take PrEP, we discuss this further below:

1. Daily PrEP

Daily PrEP Regimen: 

  • Lead in time 7 days.
  • Taken daily at the same time  +/- a few hours ok

Type:

  • Anal, Vaginal/Frontal sex

Considerations:

  • Can be taken any time of the day with or without food
  • In the event a pill is missed, adequate protection is still conferred.

2. On-Demand PrEP (Event-Based Dosing)

On-Demand PrEP Regimen: 
Planned condom-less sex 24 hours in advance:
Strictly:

  • take 2 pills 2 – 24 hours before sex
  • take 1 pill on the day of sex
  • take 1 pill 24 hours later

If having sex for an extended period of time, perhaps over a few days or a weekend, continue to take a pill every 24 hours until you have 2 sex-free days.

The regime requires the patient to take 2 tablets of the HIV PrEP medicine between 2 to 24 hours prior to the event followed by 1 tablet 24 hours after the initial dose and a final tablet 48 hours after the initial dose. Medical studies show that the protection provided against HIV for this regime is not as good as if the medicine is taken daily.
Furthermore, thus the regime is more complex and therefore increases the risk of the patient taking the wrong amount of medicine at the wrong time.

Type: 

  • Only for Anal sex
  • More studies required to show effectiveness in Vaginal/Frontal sex

Considerations:

  • This option is not recommended if you have an active hepatitis B infection. The drugs in PrEP also suppress the hepatitis B virus and so starting and stopping PrEP can cause viral flare-ups and liver inflammation.

3. Ts and Ss (Tues, Thurs, Sat, Sun dosing)

Ts and Ss Regimen:

  • Daily dosing for 7 days,
  • then dropping down to 4 pills per week on Tues/Thurs/Sat/Sun

Type: 

  • Only for Anal sex
  • More studies required to show effectiveness in Vaginal/Frontal sex

Considerations:

  • If you only have sex once or twice a month, you might not want to take a pill every day.
  • 4 pills per week will maintain a good baseline of the drug in your system and you can choose to increase up to daily 7 pills per week when you know you’re in a more sexually active period.
  • Some people using PrEP On Demand find that they might be taking 4 pills per week most weeks of the month and so opt for structuring this into the Ts and Ss instead.

4. Holiday PrEP

Holiday PrEP Regimen:

  • PrEP before a pre-planned block of time when your risk of exposure to HIV will be higher due to:
    • an increased number of partners of unknown HIV status
    • situations where condoms are not easily or always used
    • where alcohol or substances might be used
    • having sex while travelling to a country with a high HIV prevalence
  • Based on a 7-day period we recommend 7-7-7:
    • 7 days daily dosing before the period
    • 7 days daily dosing during the period (or for as long as the specific period lasts)
    • 7 days daily dosing after the period.

Type: 

  • Anal, Vaginal/Frontal sex

Considerations:

  • 7 days of PrEP before and after your last sexual encounter for several reasons:
    • 7 days lead-in provides adequate levels for both anal and vaginal or frontal sex.
    • 7 days lead in before the holiday or travel will allow the body to adjust to any possible side effects, most people do not experience any and these should have subsided within a week.

Worry Less, Worry Free!
PrEP is an ‘opt-in’ treatment – it is not meant to be taken forever.
Trying to stay HIV negative during the holiday or trip result in an anxious and stressful experience.
Your peace of mind and release from this stress and anxiety is important so that you can enjoy the moments that matter with your partner!
Safe Trip and Have Fun!
This article was written by Dr Tan & Partners, in collaboration with Oogachaga.


References

  1. Vivancos R, Abubakar I, Hunter PR. Foreign travel, casual sex, and sexually transmitted infections: systematic review and meta-analysis. International Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2010;14(10):e842–51.
  2. Svensson P.,et al. A meta-analysis and systematic literature review of factors associated with sexual risk-taking during international travel. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease. 2018; Jul – Aug;24:65-88
  3. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/std
  4. https://www.fitfortravel.nhs.uk/advice/general-travel-health-advice/sexual-health-risks
  5. Riddell Jt, Amico KR, Mayer KH. HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis: A Review. Jama. 2018;319(12):1261-8.
  6. WHO Guidelines Approved by the Guidelines Review Committee. Guideline on When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy and on Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis for HIV. Geneva: World Health Organization Copyright (c) World Health Organization 2015.; 2015.
  7. Elsesser SA, Oldenburg CE, Biello KB, Mimiaga MJ, Safren SA, Egan JE, et al. Seasons of Risk: Anticipated Behavior on Vacation and Interest in Episodic Antiretroviral Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Among a Large National Sample of U.S. Men Who have Sex with Men (MSM). AIDS and behavior. 2016;20(7):1400-7.
  8. Brett-Major DM, Scott PT, Crowell TA, Polyak CS, Modjarrad K, Robb ML, et al. Are you PEPped and PrEPped for travel? Risk mitigation of HIV infection for travelers. Tropical diseases, travel medicine and vaccines. 2016;2:25
  9. Hampel B, Reinacher M, Fehr JS, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP): Is it time to rethink HIV prevention in travelers?, Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease (2018), doi: 10.1016/j.tmaid.2018.06.008
  10. https://www.iwantprepnow.co.uk/how-to-take-prep/

Top Travel Tips for Persons Living With HIV (PLHIV)

Planning for a long Vacation or Preparing for a Business trip? The travel preparation can sometimes be challenging for People Living with HIV (PLHIV).
Making sure there is enough medication. Making sure you get the correct travel vaccine or visiting the doctor to get prescription (just in case you might be questioned during immigration check)

Travel Tips For Travelling with HIV (B.R.A.V.E)

B for Board, Bottle

Carry Your HIV Medication with You on Board
Carry your HIV medications with you on Board rather than checking them in and have a memo from the prescribing doctor’s memo with you.

Carry Your Doctor’s Memo with You
The contents of the memo should confirm that the medication is necessary during the trip. It does not need to discuss HIV and can state the medications are for a chronic medical condition and for personal use.

Use Medication’s Original Packet or Bottle
It is also advisable to have the medication’s original packet/ Bottle, showing the name of the person carrying the medication and medication details.

R for Reveal, Reiterate

You Don’t Need to Discuss Your HIV Status!
When crossing international borders, one might be questioned on the medication carried. Preparing for these questions can facilitate an easier border crossing experience. HIV need not be discussed or Revealed and that these medications are for a chronic health problem can be Reiterated.

A for Adjust, Avoid,  Anonymous Testing, Advice

Adjusting Your Dose Timing
Discuss with your doctor dose timing adjustments when travelling across different time zones. Medication can usually be taken one or two hours later for a number of days until the timing fits with the destination country. The process should be reversed on return.

Avoid Missing Your Medication Dose
Missing medication doses should be avoided at all cost. Treatment breaks should be avoided unless discussed with your doctor.
 
 Advice, Anonymous testing
If you are travelling in and out of Singapore and need advice on HIV treatment or testing, At DTAP, we provide a safe and discreet environment for testing. You can find out more about Anonymous HIV Testing.

V for Vaccinations

General principles for vaccination of PLHIV as follows:

  • Killed or inactivated vaccines do not represent a danger to immunocompromised people and generally should be administered as recommended for other people.
  • Live-virus or live-bacteria vaccines such as BCG, oral poliovirus, typhoid (Ty21a), varicella, Yellow fever should be avoided unless the benefits outweigh the cons

The main vaccinations we recommend for PLHIV besides the country-specific vaccinations are.

  1. HPV Vaccination
  2. Hepatitis A
  3. Hepatitis B
  4. Influenza
  5. Pneumococcal
  6. Meningococcal

E for Extra Medication

Bring Extra Medication
It is imperative to bring enough medication and slightly more for a few days as getting a prescription or purchasing your medications in a foreign country may not always be possible. Furthermore, there is no way to ascertain whether the purchased medication might be of the same quality, type and efficacy.

If you are travelling with a partner/s who are not HIV positive, you can find out more information on getting PrEP (Pre Exposure Prophylaxis) for their protection as well – Non-HIV partners for HIV PrEP.

Here are some further resources you can explore to find out more about the country you are travelling to and its restrictions if any:
1.) www.aidsmap.com – HIV-related services worldwide and access country-specific information and news 
2.) www.hivtravel.org – International database on HIV related travel and occupation

Safe Trip and Have Fun!
This article was written by DTAP, in collaboration with Oogachaga.

What is Rapid Chlamydia & Gonorrhea PCR STD Testing?

Chlamydia and gonorrhoea are 2 common Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) which can infections in various parts of the body such as penis, vaginal, anus, throat and eyes.
Most commonly you will experience discharges from the penis/ vaginal or discomfort when passing urine.
However, the majority of men may not have any symptoms and for women, 50% may also not have symptoms.
The infection will stay in the body for a few weeks after the symptoms have been treated.
In rare instances, Gonorrhoea and Chlamydia can continue to cause damage to the body, specifically the urethra and testicles. Pain may also spread to the rectum. An overview of Gonorrhoea

At Dr Tan and Partners, we recognize that symptoms like abnormal vaginal discharges, penile discharge or discharge from the rectum can cause quite a bit of worry.
Thus, we have introduced a Rapid STD testing (next day results) that can detect these 2 infections within a day.
Which means that you can get the necessary treatment quickly as well.
All it requires is a urine sample or swab from the vaginal/ throat/ anal

This Rapid STD Testing detects for the presence of the DNA of the 2 organisms, making the test very sensitive

If you think you may have symptoms suggestive of chlamydia or gonorrhoea infection or if you think you may have been exposed and you are interested in an STD Screening, please visit a doctor for further evaluation.

Take Care!


Other Reads:

  1. Do I Have HIV Rash? Or Are They Other STD-Related Rashes?
  2. Weak Erection? Erectile Dysfunction? How to Improve Erection with Pills
  3. HPV Infection & HPV Vaccination for Men who have sex with Men
  4. STD Risk for Receptive Unprotected Anal Sex in Men
  5. Low HIV Risk Doesn’t Mean No HIV Risk
  6. HIV PrEP for Travel – How You Need to Know
  7. An Overview on STD from an STD Doctor
  8. Everything You Need to Know about Herpes Simplex Virus
  9. How Do I Treat Oral Herpes (Cold Sores)
  10. Syphilis Symptoms – Painless Sore & Ulcers
  11. HIV Symptoms – What You Need to Know
  12. 10 Common HIV related Opportunistic Infections

11 Causes of Dyspareunia in Women (Pain During Intercourse)

Dyspareunia or Pain During Intercourse is a condition whereby people experience pain during sexual intercourse. Both men and women can experience pain during sex sometime during their lives. However, it is much more common for women. Particularly in young women who are inexperienced or women who are in the perimenopause or menopause stages.

There is not much awareness about this topic as there is still a stigma surrounding it. Consequently, women are not speaking to their sexual partner, friends, close family or doctor when faced with this issue. If the situation is not dealt with, it may lead to other problems. Besides not being able to enjoy sex, the pain will progressively worsen due to the muscles tightening up.
Dyspareunia will have a negative physical impact on you, as well as being able to emotionally affect you and your partner’s relationship.

Pain During Intercourse can be classified into either deep or superficial pain during sex.

 

Causes of superficial pain include:

1.) Vaginismus

Vaginismus is the spasms of vaginal muscles which arises from the fear of being hurt. This can cause both deep and superficial pain, making sex extremely painful and sometimes even impossible. As a result of fear of vaginal examinations, women with vaginismus may never be able to use tampons or have a pap smear test.
The causes of vaginismus can be attributed to a restrictive upbringing, a history of rape or sexual abuse as a child, or past painful vaginal infections such as genital herpes.

2.) Lack of Vaginal Lubrication

This is arguably the most common cause of dyspareunia. Lack of vaginal lubrication can be due to nervousness, failure to relax, not having enough foreplay, or having unskilled foreplay performed by the male partner. Dyspareunia because of this can be resolved through increased foreplay, using lubricants by both counterparts, or if the female can become more relaxed.
One feature of menopause is the fall in production of the female hormone oestrogen, this causes vaginal dryness in perimenopausal or menopausal women. In this case, using lubricants during sex should reduce the pain substantially. Other treatment options available for these women are hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or vaginal hormone creams with the purpose to actively boost oestrogen production.

3.) Vaginitis (Inflammation of the Vagina)

Vaginitis is essentially the inflammation of the vagina which is caused by infections from thrush (candida), trichomonas or bacterial vaginosis (BV).
Common symptoms of this condition would be abnormal vaginal discharge, as well as itchiness and a burning sensation in the vagina and vulva (opening of the vagina).

Another type of causes, especially if associated with an infection, can also cause pain.
This includes:

  • Genital herpes
  • Foreign body in the vagina
  • Forgotten tampon

Generally, treating the infection will simultaneously clear dyspareunia.

4.) Vulvitis (Inflammation of the Vulva)

Vulvitis is the inflammation of the vulva (opening of the vagina) that can progressively lead to cracks in the skin of the vulva. It can also cause pain (including dyspareunia), itching and a burning sensation in the vulva.
Contact dermatitis is a common skin disorder that can also lead to inflammation of the surrounding skin of the vulva either due to an allergic reaction or direct exposure to agents like perfumed soaps, douches or lubricants.

5. Injury

Injuries to the vulva commonly stem from labour. During labour, episiotomy cuts or tears can occur. If unattended to, it may cause pain during sex for an extended period of time. Otherwise, badly healed stitches can cause pain too.
If you are experiencing any of these problems, it is advised to see a doctor sooner.

Causes for deep pain include:

6. Problems with the Cervix

During sex, the penis is able to come into contact with the cervix (opening of the womb). This can cause pain due to deep penetration, also known as ‘collision dyspareunia’. This open contact can also cause STDs such as gonorrhoea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis, genital herpes and others.
Additionally, if an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) or ‘coil’ planted at the cervical canal becomes displaced during sex, this can also cause pain.

7. Problems with the Uterus (womb) or Ovaries

Womb disorders or other problems in this region can cause deep pain during sex, such as:

  • Fibroids
  • Fixed retroverted uterus
  • Ovarian cysts

8. Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a disorder in which the tissues intended to line the uterus start growing outside the uterus. The location where endometriosis occurs will determine how much pain you experience during sex. The pain is expected to be more intense if endometriosis occurs behind the vagina and lower part of the uterus.

9. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)

PID is caused by a sexually-transmitted infection in the upper female genital tract (pelvis). During sex, pressure on these badly inflamed tissues in the affected region can cause deep pain.

10. Pelvic Adhesions

Pelvic adhesions are when the tissues in the upper female genital tract (pelvis) become stuck together. This development is usually due to the aftermath of surgery, injury (trauma), radiation treatment or infection, like a complication of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). These adhesions can cause pain, including dyspareunia.

11. Ectopic Pregnancy

An ectopic pregnancy is when the pregnancy is located outside the womb, like in the fallopian tubes, cervix or ovary. As this type of pregnancy develops, it will stretch out the surrounding tissue, creating discomfort. Pressure on this region during sex will cause more pain.
If you are experiencing repeated pain during or after sex, do not hesitate to see a doctor or visit our clinic as dyspareunia is not normal and often the underlying cause is curable. The longer you leave it, the more issues it may cause to yourself and also may lead to a detrimental effect on your relationship with your partner.

If you are experiencing Pain During Intercourse, it is highly recommended to visit our doctor at our DTAP Clinics as soon as possible, especially if the pain becomes persistent. Most causes of dyspareunia are not serious. However, there is a few that can be severely detrimental to your health and well-being.

Take Care!

Other Interesting Reads:

    1. What You Need To Know about HPV, Cervical Cancer, Pap Smear & HPV Vaccination
    2. 11 Causes of Dyspareunia (Pain During Intercourse)
    3. What is HPV Vaccination (Gardasil 9)
    4. 10 Causes of abnormal Vaginal Lumps and Bumps
    5. An Overview of Gonorrhoea
    6. What is the Treatment for Cold Sores? What causes Cold Sores?
    7. Sex During Period (Sex & Menstruation) What To Know

 

Is Premature Ejaculation a Problem?

Too Fast? Too Slow?

Premature ejaculation or PE occurs when a man reaches orgasm and ejaculates with minimal stimulation or within a very short period of time.
There is no uniform cut-off timing for what constitutes as PE, and in the past, most experts would agree that last less than one minute is a cause for concern.
However, newer guidelines suggest that any man who feels they do not have control over when he ejaculates and that it causes distress to him and his partner can be considered to have premature ejaculation.

Is Premature Ejaculation a Problem?

Of course, Premature Ejaculation is a real problem if:

  • It is causing or arising from inter-personal relationship problems.
  • It is causing or arising from psychological issues like anxiety and depression.
  • It is a sign of hidden erectile dysfunction (ED).
  • It is due to a low serum Testosterone level.
  • It is a sign of an underlying medical disease.
  • It is due to stopping a drug.
  • It is severe enough to affect fertility.

Sometimes premature ejaculation may be caused or worsened by other conditions, such as anxiety and depression, erectile dysfunction, prostatitis and testosterone deficiency.
These conditions will be assessed with a clinical history and may need further investigation if appropriate.

Is there any treatment for Premature Ejaculation?

There are several options for treatment of premature ejaculation, although a combination of certain medication and non-pharmacological treatments often give the best results.

If you think that you or your partner may be suffering from premature ejaculation, please visit our DTAP Clinics for a thorough evaluation and discussion on Premature Ejaculation Treatment options.

Take Care!


Related Read:

  1. STD Risk for Receptive Unprotected Anal Sex in Men
  2. 10 Ways to Improve Sexual Performance for Men
  3. Weak Erection? Erectile Dysfunction? Improv Erection with Pills
  4. Weak Erection: Does Penis Size Matters?
  5. Pearly Penile Papules (Bumps On Penis)
  6. Phimosis – Unusually Tight Foreskin 
  7. An Overview of STD – From an STD Doctor
  8. What are the Signs & Symptoms of HIV and AIDS?
  9. What Causes Men’s Pattern hair loss (Androgenic Alopecia)
  10. Pills That Prevent HIV – HIV PrEP & HIV PEP
  11. What are the Causes of Foreskin Infection?

 

What Are the Top 7 Reason Men Undergo Circumcision?

Circumcision has always been a hot topic for discussion. Some are against it, and some are for it. One thing for sure is that it has a lot of benefits.
Circumcision is a medical procedure for foreskin removal.
I will be sharing with you the Top 7 Reasons of circumcision so that you can make your own decision if it is something suitable for you.

Better Hygiene

The presence of the foreskin increases moisture and warmth around the penis. And this promotes the collection of smegma which is a combination of shed skin cells, skin oils, and moisture.
When accumulated, it will contribute to a foul odour and leads to poor hygiene.
When circumcised, they won’t be any more space for the smegma to accumulate.
So your penis will have better hygiene and even smell better.

Reduce Risk of Balanitis

Balanitis is an infection of the penis tip and foreskin. It is most commonly caused by Candida which is a type of yeast.
It’s uncomfortable and irritating and for some people, they get infected multiple times.
When you’re circumcised, you have an almost negligible risk of getting balanitis.
Saves you the trip to the doctors and the money to see one.

Reduce the risk of STDs and HIV

In Africa, adult circumcision is advocated in order to bring down the HIV epidemic.
Some STDs are treatable (see STD treatments) however HIV is not (see HIV Management).
If you can further reduce the risk of contracting this deadly disease, why not?

Prevent cancer

Circumcision is also associated with a lower risk of getting penile cancer, and reduced risk of cervical cancer in their partners.
You’re not only saving yourself but also your partner. It’s a win-win!

Less UTIs

Bacteria usually cause UTI’s or urinary tract infection.
Symptoms include painful urination and or blood in the urine. It’s very annoying to have.
Will be quite useful to have one less disease to be worried about.

Better Sex

Nowadays many women prefer men who are circumcised or cut. There are various reasons for this. Some like the appearance and find it a turn on.
Some love it that it is cleaner and smells better and it makes them feel more comfortable during sex. And of course, when you are circumcised you won’t have pain during intercourse. Which could be due to a tight foreskin or from paraphimosis.
Paraphimosis is a condition where the foreskin gets stuck below the head. It’s a medical emergency that requires immediate treatment.
Better sex is always a lovely bonus.

Last longer in bed

With the foreskin removed, the head of the penis will get exposed all the time.
This will lead to keratinisation of the head. Hence it will desensitize it.
When more desensitized, it will help you last longer in bed. And now you’re gonna be a stud in the bedroom.

That’s All Folks!
If you wish to know more about Adult Circumcision and How is it performed visit our Mens Health Page.


Related Read:

  1. STD Risk for Receptive Unprotected Anal Sex in Men
  2. 10 Ways to Improve Sexual Performance for Men
  3. Weak Erection? Erectile Dysfunction? Improv Erection with Pills
  4. Pearly Penile Papules (Bumps On Penis)
  5. Phimosis – Unusually Tight Foreskin 
  6. An Overview of STD – From an STD Doctor
  7. What are the Signs & Symptoms of HIV and AIDS?
  8. What Causes Men’s Pattern hair loss (Androgenic Alopecia)
  9. Pills That Prevent HIV – HIV PrEP & HIV PEP
  10. What are the Causes of Foreskin Infection?

What are the Causes of Swimmer’s Ear or Outer Ear Infection?

(OTITIS EXTERNA aka Swimmer’s ear or Outer Ear Infection)
The external ear canal is the part of the ear that connects the outer ear to the eardrum. This outer ear infection takes place in the external ear canal and usually presents a sudden painful condition usually caused by bacterial infection, inflammation or sometimes fungal infection.
People who are predisposed to outer ear infection includes the young and adolescent group, people with skin conditions like eczema or psoriasis, and people with excessive ear wax production.

The natural defence mechanism of the ear canal

  • The narrow ear canal serve to reduce entry of contaminants
  • The sticky nature of the ear wax helps to maintain a harsh environment for bacteria, helping to trap fine debris and also repel water.

 

What are the Causes of Swimmer’s Ears or Outer Ear Infection?

A moist ear canal can serve as a reservoir for bacterial (most common cause) or fungal infection to seed on.
Other factors that contribute to outer ear infection:

  • Exposure to contaminated water, swimming pool or hot tubs
  • Contact with allergic or corrosive chemicals such as hair dye or spray
  • Excessive ear canal cleaning with cotton buds
  • Skin barrier impairment over the ear canal secondary to eczema/ psoriasis or abrasions secondary to scratching
  • Using ear canal devices such as earphones, hearing aids, diving caps
  • Complication from water irrigation during ear wax removal procedures

Concurrent infection which causes inflammation and swelling of the skin. This leads to obstruction, itch and scratching of the ear canal which will create further injury, thus worsening the condition.
 

What are the Signs and symptoms of Swimmer’s Ears or Outer Ear Infection?

  • Ear pain
  • Itch
  • Discharges from ear
  • The feeling of blocked ear
  • Reduced hearing

 

What are the treatments for Swimmer’s Ears or Outer Ear Infection?

The treatment goal is to control pain and treat the infection.

  • Careful cleaning of the ear canal using specialized equipment
  • Eardrops to reduce inflammation and hinder the growth of bacteria and fungus

With the removal of debris in the ear, this will facilitate the absorption of ear drops in the ear canal.
In addition, the doctor can place a sponge or wick in the canal if it is swollen. This will increase the delivery of ear drops into the ear canal.

How to take care of your ears?
It is important to avoid the ear canal from getting wet during treatment. Extra precautions should be taken while showering. Avoid swimming 7-10 days during infection is of great importance.
 
If you swim regularly, consider

  • Shake your ears dry after swimming
  • Blow dry the ears with low setting dryer held from a distance away
  • Use earplugs during swimming

 
Are there any Follow-ups?
A patient needs to be follow up 36-48 hours after treatment initiation to monitor symptoms. Sometimes, the ear may need cleansing again using specialized equipment by a doctor in addition to the installation of ear drops.

Most external ear infection improves within 7-10 days.

If you think you have outer ear infection, please speak to any of our friendly doctors at any of our clinics to discuss further, or drop us an email at hello@dtapclinic.com.sg

What are the Cause of Foreskin Infection (Balanitis)?

What is Balanitis?

Balanitis is a common infection that affects the head of the penis and the foreskin.
It is more commonly seen in boys and men who are not circumcised.

What are the Signs & Symptoms of Balanitis?

The Common Symptoms of the infection of the Penis include a sore, itchy and smelly penis, redness and swelling, the build-up of thick fluid around your penis, and pain when peeing.

Phimosis can increase the risk of balanitis.
Some adults may also have a tight foreskin that is unable to be fully retracted. This is called phimosis and can increase the risk of balanitis.

What are the Causes of Balanitis?

Balanitis can be caused by poor hygiene.
This can lead to a build-up of Smegma is a buildup of dead skin cells, oil, and other fluids on the tip of the penis.
If left for prolonged periods it can lead to fungal and bacterial infections.

What are the Treatments of Balanitis?

You should see your doctor if you have persistent swelling, redness or irritation or if you have other accompanying symptoms like penile discharge or painful urination.
In most cases of balanitis are easily treated with good hygiene and creams and ointments recommended by your doctors.
Also, circumcision may be advised in recurrent cases of balanitis.
You can have sex during treatment if your balanitis isn’t caused by an infection.
But if it’s caused by an infection, like an STI or thrush, there’s a risk of passing this on.
Do consult any of our doctors if you are ever unsure of your symptoms so that we can do a proper examination and also to perform any lab tests if necessary.

If you wish to know more about Balanitis, please visit our DTAP Clinics or drop us an email at hello@dtapclinic.com.sg


Other Reads:

  1. Do I Have HIV Rash? Or Are They Other STD-Related Rashes?
  2. Weak Erection? Erectile Dysfunction? How to Improve Erection with Pills
  3. HPV Infection & HPV Vaccination for Men who have sex with Men
  4. STD Risk for Receptive Unprotected Anal Sex in Men
  5. An Overview on STD from an STD Doctor
  6. Everything You Need to Know about Herpes Simplex Virus
  7. How Do I Treat Oral Herpes (Cold Sores)
  8. Syphilis Symptoms – Painless Sore & Ulcers
  9. HIV Symptoms – What You Need to Know